Discovery Issue
Hello, I have been working with Boundaries and discovery. We cannot use an AD boundary because we have multiple sites in our domain. I began with an IP Subnet boundary limited to one subnet. Then I added an OU in AD System Discovery. The example IP Subnet was 192.168.100.0, 255.255.255.0 No clients were discovered. Then I removed the IP Subnet and switched to an IP range that included the same IP's as the subnet. The example IP Range was 192.168.100.20-192.168.100.254. The lower portion of this range is reserved for network equipment so I don't care about it. The actual IP values are a public class B range, but subnetted into class C's. The sample above is similar to what I used. So why wouldn't the IP subnet work where the range did? I have exactly 80 subnets to set up as boundaries for my site. How can I go about troubleshooting the IP Subnet boundaries? Thanks, Steve
October 22nd, 2010 11:52pm

Because although its called a subnet boundary, it's actually a network ID which depending on the context can be matched differently. Do you have subnets defined in Active Directory? Do you have this particular subnet defined in AD? AD System Discovery looks up IP addresses returned from name resolution in AD to determine their network IDs and from there matches these against the boundaries. Right-click on a resource in question and see what Network ID was discovered in the resulting properties box.Jason | http://myitforum.com/cs2/blogs/jsandys | http://blogs.catapultsystems.com/jsandys/default.aspx | Twitter @JasonSandys
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October 23rd, 2010 1:11am

Using IP subnets can be tricky. Your IP plus subnet mask must match the actual subnet ID or it won't work. It works good for normal class C sunets but anything else can be flaky. I normally use ranges because they simply work. John Marcum | http://myitforum.com/cs2/blogs/jmarcum |
October 25th, 2010 8:49pm

Because although its called a subnet boundary, it's actually a network ID which depending on the context can be matched differently. Do you have subnets defined in Active Directory? Do you have this particular subnet defined in AD? AD System Discovery looks up IP addresses returned from name resolution in AD to determine their network IDs and from there matches these against the boundaries. Right-click on a resource in question and see what Network ID was discovered in the resulting properties box. Jason | http://myitforum.com/cs2/blogs/jsandys | http://blogs.catapultsystems.com/jsandys/default.aspx | Twitter @JasonSandys Thank you for responding Jason, So you are saying that the IP Subnets would need to be defined in AD in order to use them in SCCM? I know for a fact that we do not define subnets in AD. I don't mind that this is the case, because if it is then we just need to know this so we can use IP Ranges instead. I would need to inform the other department's SCCM admins as they are looking to me to answer this question.
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October 25th, 2010 8:52pm

I am beginning to understand that IP Subnets are a pain to implement. I am sticking with ranges. Thanks for the replies.
October 26th, 2010 11:31am

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